Monday, May 2, 2011

New on the Job? Make the most of it!

For those of you setting off into your first full-time post-MBA job, or your MBA internship, you have an opportunity in front of you, many in fact. You have a newness that only comes once (well, twice) in a lifetime. You are either in the midst of pursuing your MBA or you have just finished – there aren’t many people who take on that challenge (or debt) more than once. Now is your chance to take advantage of it.

As a newbie to a job, you have the chance to ask questions – besides, “where’s the nearest restroom?”, that seasoned professionals are often afraid to ask. You come in with a level of credibility due to your recent academic prowess – a credibility that enamors some, while intimidating others. You also bring with you an amazing skill set that you are primed and ready to use. One of your challenges lies in figuring out how to put to use those concepts and theories you’ve spent the last several months studying, thinking about and discussing. Your other challenge is to figure out what it is about the job that motivates you, and you can leverage to make it your best possible job.

In Edward Hallowell’s book, Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best out of Your People, he speaks about what’s included in the “best job.” The best job incorporates:

  1. What a person likes to do
  2. What she is best at doing
  3. What adds value to the team, task, or organization
Wouldn't it be great if each of us could find that “best job.”

Spending the time now, to figure out what makes your “best job,” will set you on the path to finding great career success. Not only will you out perform those in similar positions, who just kind of like the work, but you’ll also be loving what you do – which means, you’ll put out an amazing amount of discretionary effort. That discretionary effort is what will take you to the next level, while enjoying your work.

Here are a few steps for you to consider as you embark on creating this best job (adapted from Marshall Goldsmith’s latest book, Mojo)…
  1. Identify: Take time to understand who you think you are.
  2. Achievement: Take stock of what you’ve done lately.
  3. Reputation: Understand and seek input on what people think of you.
  4. Acceptance: Determine what you can change and/or influence
It is easy to get excited about and consumed by the newness of what we are doing - take the time you need to step back and reflect. I hope you’ll find it to be a relaxing, and useful exercise that helps you find your “best job.”

And finally, ask yourself this question:What would you do differently?

Take a minute to let us know what you learn…whether it is within your upcoming change, or one in the past.

1 comment:

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